Connect with us

Telecom

NASENI, Agric Ministry Agree to Partner on Agro-Industrialization, Climate Change Mitigation & Others

Published

on

Kindly share this post

National Agency for Science and Engineering Infrastructure (NASENI) and the Federal Ministry of Agriculture and Food Security have commenced discussions on how to deploy existing technical competencies and other resources by the two institutions to improve agro allied-industries development targets, climate change mitigations and smart solar irrigation aimed at dry-season farming.

The trio of the Minister of Agriculture & Food Security, Senator Abubakar Kyari, the Minister of State, Hon. Sabi Aliyu Abdullahi and the Executive Vice Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of NASENI, Mr. Khalil Suleiman Halilu who held the meeting in Abuja yesterday 6th November, 2023 agreed that the nascent collaboration between NASENI and Agric Ministry was aimed at enhancing the focus and deliverables toward achievement of the Renewed Hope Agenda by the President Bola Ahmed Tinubu administration.

The Minister, Senator Abubakar Kyari gave insight to some of the essentials in the 8-Point Renewed Hope Agenda of the government, saying that about six of the eight socio-economic recovery programmes have the starting points in their achievements rooted in the success of the Agricultural sector, his ministry.

Therefore, the Minister commended Halilu, EVC of NASENI and his team for having agriculture as one of the Agency’s target areas to work. “I won’t be tired of saying that President Bola Ahmed Tinubu has given my Ministry the responsibility to carry out one of the important programmes in the 8-point Renewed Hope agenda, which is food security and five others.” he said.

During the visit, Halilu was received not only by Senator Abubakar Kyari and the Minister of State, but all the directors in the Ministry were present at the meeting. Halilu said the Agency was ready to collaborate with the Ministry to boost agriculture and also achieve food security through technology adaptation and transfers.

Addressing the Ministry’s top government functionaries, Halilu explained that NASENI’s technical manpower, technologies and also international partners were ready to work in ensuring that Nigeria becomes self-sufficient in food production, food processing and exports.

Part of the efforts in actualizing this goal, he disclosed, is the on-going NASENI Scheme to refurbish about 50,000 broken tractors across the country under the presidential initiative, aimed at bringing back the culture of large cultivation of lands for farming.

According to him, the management of NASENI has secured both local and international technical partners to work with the Agency to mass-produce Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) for spraying of insecticides over vast farm locations, sustain afforestation, introduce solar-powered water irrigation to increase wet and dry season farming yields, cold chain food processing and agro-allied value chain additions for preservation and processing of foods in commercial quantities and exports.

Halilu said the collaboration plans with Agric Ministry includes crop traceability, rice straw project, mitigation of climate change through scientific and technological researches or innovations by NASENI to increase food production, value addition and ensue Nigeria’s dependence on food imports reduce significantly.

“We are embarking on development activities in agriculture from production to commercialization.  The key thing is how we can add value to our farm produce or raw materials before they are consumed or before exporting them out of our country.

“Also, as for foreign technologies brought into our country, we are seeking the cooperation and collaboration of the Ministry to transfer, domesticate and commercialize such technologies. In a nutshell, this is why we are here” Halilu stated.

The EVC said since assuming office, he has been receiving a lot of requests in terms of how NASENI could add value around agriculture from production all the way to the market.

He disclosed that a recent outing by the Agency at the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) Forum in China attracted about $6 billion dollars’ investment and about 40 per cent of the monies will be channeled to agriculture.

As his remark on the significance of the meeting, the Minister of State expressed appreciation of the visit by NASENI’s EVC and his team, describing the move as progressive and patriotic.

He said the time to put an end to inter-ministerial competition and rivalry is now, rather, synergy and collaboration amongst government institutions should become the new culture and orientation.

He underscored the earlier statement by Senator Kyari that one of the Federal Government’s current priorities is food security.

Therefore, he called for alignments with the Agric Ministry’s focus not only by NASENI but other Agencies with related functions in order to actualize the Government’s intentions to alleviate poverty, create jobs and tackle all other socio-economic ills in Nigeria society.


Kindly share this post

Ugo Onwuaso is an ICT enthusiast. He believes technology should be used for general good. He holds a Master of Public Administration (MPA) degree from the Lagos state University. Dear Reader, Your support matters. But we believe that technology makes life more exciting and helps improve the lives of people around Nigeria and indeed the world. That is why, we have devoted our energy to independent reportage of technology and finance and how they affect lives. Our incisive and analytical view of how technology news affects the daily life help individuals and organizations make up their minds. Quality journalism costs money. Today, we're asking that you support us to do more. Kindly support our effort to deliver technology and finance journalism to everyone in the world. Donate as little as N1,000. Bank transfers can be made to: UBA Plc 1017156876 Communication Week Media Ltd

Telecom

Imperative of Upholding Nigeria’s Telecoms Lifeline  

Published

on

Kindly share this post

By Ikemesit Effiong    

It is neither profound nor insightful to state that Nigeria is living through a near-unprecedented cost-of-living crisis.

Imperative of Upholding Nigeria's Telecoms Lifeline  

Aminu Maida, executive vice chairman, NCC

Core inflation touched 33.2% in March with food inflation now an eye-watering 40% – the highest in post-1999 democratic Nigerian history.

It may sound a bit apocalyptic but we are heading towards our all-time high of 47.6% recorded in January 1996.

We have already burst past March 1996’s reading of 31.7%. In a note on future inflationary trends in Nigeria, Aaron O’Neill at Statista made two salient points: our inflation has been higher than the African average for more than a decade now and a significant decrease is unlikely for quite some time.

The International Monetary Fund’s expectation that annual inflation this year will average out at 22.96% is increasingly looking a tad too optimistic.

The bigger challenge though, in his view, is our inflation’s unsteadiness. Food inflation is now at levels not seen since August 2005.

Plantain prices have increased by 129%, rice by 98%, onion prices by 97%, bread by 71% and beans by 64% – between January 2023 and January 2024 alone according to the National Bureau of Statistics.

An inflation rate that is all over the place is usually a sign of an economy that is huffing and puffing, causing prices to fluctuate, and unemployment and poverty to increase.

Nigeria’s economy – a mixed economy where state participation in economic life is higher than most free-market economies – is not entirely in bad shape.

More than half of its Gross Domestic Product (GDP) is generated by the services sector – chiefly telecommunications and finances, typically a feature of advanced economies.

Notwithstanding, the private sector is teetering.

The Financial Times reports that Nigerian Breweries (NB), which is part-owned by Heineken, has increased prices three times this year.

“So dire is the economic distress in Africa’s most populous nation that the brewer’s chief executive, Hans Essaadi, complained on an investor call that “customers can no longer afford Goldberg, a cheap and well-loved lager,” the London-based publication highlighted this as illustrative of the travails of some of the country’s biggest corporates.

Fixed foreign currency-denominated costs, import restrictions, uncertain policy-setting, a weak Naira and insecurity in many operating areas have forced most like NB to raise prices; some like Procter & Gamble to quit manufacturing in-country or others like GSK and Bayer to contract third parties to distribute their products.

There is one sector, however, that has seen little action in this direction.

The Imperative of Telecom Tariff Revision

At the nexus of connectivity and commerce, the telecommunications industry in Nigeria plays a dual role: as an economic engine and a societal enabler.

The sector’s investment profile in the country stood at $75.6 billion as of 2021, according to the Nigerian Communications Commission (NCC). Nigeria’s 221.7 million active voice subscriptions and 160.2 million data subscriptions now support a substantial 14% of GDP.

The country’s rising teledensity is such a critical linchpin for economic growth and infrastructural development that any disruptions exact a heavy price.

A 2021 SBM Intelligence survey found that 53% of respondents were “very” negatively impacted by an NCC-mandated shutdown of telecom services in the North-West due to regional security operations.

Moreover, the sector stands as a significant employer, empowering millions of Nigerians with opportunities for livelihood and advancement.

As such, the industry’s health is not merely a matter of corporate profit margins but a national imperative intertwined with the fabric of its progress.

Central to the sustenance of any industry is a conducive economic environment that allows for sustainable growth and innovation.

However, the existing regulatory framework, which shackles tariff adjustments, undermines this fundamental principle.

While other sectors have adeptly responded to economic fluctuations by revising prices, the telecom industry remains bound by regulatory constraints, impeding its ability to adapt to changing market dynamics.

A Perfect Storm: Challenges Hinder Growth      

While Nigeria’s four Mobile Network Operators (MNOs) relentlessly strive for service excellence through consistent network upgrades, their efforts are stymied by environmental and infrastructural obstacles.

Frequent fibre optic cable cuts due to road construction and vandalism; multiple taxation, coupled with the ever-present challenge of acquiring rights-of-way including charges related thereto, act as significant impediments.

These issues, further compounded by exploitative rent-seeking practices, have long plagued the industry, defying resolution despite concerted efforts.

These challenges are not lost on key stakeholders like the Nigerian Communications Commission (NCC), the Ministry of Communication, Innovation & Digital Economy, and a well-informed consortium of governmental and media entities.

MNOs have proactively engaged through media platforms, highlighting these issues and advocating for urgent government intervention.

The industry’s push for Critical Infrastructure Protection for ICT/Telecommunications and the reduction of exorbitant right-of-way (RoW) charges exemplify this proactive approach. Katsina, Nasarawa and Zamfara now lead the country in eliminating RoW charges but much of the country remains an operational nightmare for MNOs.

The Unsustainable Squeeze: Rising Costs, Stagnant Tariffs                         

Despite the advent of GSM technology 23 years ago, a disquieting public perception persists – that of consistently poor Quality of Service (QoS).

While this perception may have elements of truth, it’s crucial to recognise the mitigating factors beyond the control of the operators.

Economic hardship has led to an exponential increase in the cost of all consumer goods and services, with a glaring exception: telecommunication services.

The reason? Price regulation by the NCC.

This price stagnation stands in stark contrast to the reality faced by MNOs.

The industry is heavily reliant on foreign exchange (FX) for crucial equipment and services.

Most telecommunication equipment are imported with the absence of local alternatives as there are primarily four to five core manufacturers of telecommunications equipment and none is situated in Nigeria, or even Africa.

The depreciation of the Naira has significantly inflated operational costs, further straining already tight profit margins. It is unsustainable to expect ever-increasing network investments in the face of frozen tariffs.

The Current State of Play            

Nigeria’s approach to setting tariffs in the telecommunications sector has evolved through a combination of regulatory frameworks, market dynamics, and economic considerations.

During the industry’s transformation in the early 2000s with the issuance of licenses to private operators, tariff regulation was crucial in ensuring consumer protection and promoting fair competition.

The NCC implemented tariff guidelines to prevent anti-competitive practices and safeguard consumers from excessive charges. Tariff regulation also aimed to balance the interests of consumers with the need for MNOs to generate revenue for network expansion and improvement.

For an industry in its infancy striving to offer Nigerians access to new forms of technology and communications, it was necessary to guide pricing to enhance market adoption.

Competition added extra pressure on prices, a wealth of choices ultimately benefiting the consumer. Through it all, the margins were sufficient to incentivise operators to carry out the most extensive investment rollout in Nigerian history.

The market is more mature now and the booming economy of the 2000s is a fading memory.

Mobile phone, and broadband penetration are now at over 100 and 40% respectively, while the entire country is practically covered by 3G and 2G.

The digital economy with the immense success of content creators, e-commerce, software education, financial inclusion, cross-border freelancing and social connectedness has been built on the back of the telecom industry’s investment priorities.

The cost of providing existing services, the competitiveness required to sustain the continued rollout of 4G and eventually 5G technology and wider market dynamics have meant the current tariff structure is less a cushion for customers and more a shackle for operators.

The Path Forward: Rethinking Tariffs                    

In advocating for tariff revision, it is imperative to contextualise the industry’s plight within the broader narrative of economic sustainability and national progress.

Urgent measures must be taken to safeguard an industry that serves as a catalyst for economic growth and societal empowerment.

Tariff revision is not merely a corporate prerogative but a strategic imperative essential for the industry’s survival and a calculated investment in Nigeria’s future.

The additional revenue generated will directly translate into network infrastructure upgrades and modernisation. This translates to tangible benefits for all stakeholders.

A conducive regulatory environment is important in fostering the telecom industry’s resilience and vitality. Responsible government policies that prioritise infrastructure protection and investment incentives are indispensable in fortifying the industry’s foundations. Moreover, enhancing the operating environment for telecoms is not only in the national interest but also a catalyst for attracting Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) essential for sustainable growth.

Many may argue that reviewing tariffs at a time of stagnant wages, decreasing investments and rising prices is unreasonable but ensuring the long-term viability of a critical industry requires a collaborative effort. Regulators need to consider a data-driven and transparent tariff review that reflects the economic realities faced by the sector.

Aminu Maida, the NCC’s Executive Vice-Chairman rightly told the Nigerian Information Technology Reporters Association (NITRA) in February that customers expect excellent quality of service and operators will be held accountable for poor service delivery. Indeed, customers deserve the best possible service, and operators, going by the billions of dollars in present and future investment commitments, appear dedicated to delivering it.

A sustainable and well-regulated telecoms sector is the cornerstone of achieving this shared vision. It starts with rethinking how much operators are allowed to charge their clients.

Effiong is a legal practitioner, Partner and Head of Research at  and Chairman of the Technology Committee of the Nigerian Bar Association Section on Business Law.

 

 


Kindly share this post
Continue Reading

Telecom

Samsung Returns to Top of The Smartphone Market – Industry tracker

Published

on

Kindly share this post

Samsung regained its position as the top smartphone seller, wresting back the lead from Apple as Chinese rivals close the gap on both market leaders, industry tracker International Data Corporation (IDC) reported Monday.

South Korea-based Samsung overtook Apple as worldwide smartphone shipments grew nearly 8 percent in the first quarter of this year to 289.4 million, IDC said, citing its preliminary data.

It was the third consecutive quarter of growth in the global smartphone market, signalling that a recovery from a slump in the sector is underway, according to IDC.

IDC Worldwide Mobility and Consumer Device Trackers team vice president Ryan Reith expected top smartphone companies to gain share and small brands to struggle for position as recovery progresses.

Samsung shipped 60.1 million smartphones in the first quarter of this year, claiming nearly 21 percent of the market, according to IDC figures.

Apple shipped 50.1 million iPhones, garnering just over 17 percent of the market in the same period, IDC reported.

Apple smartphone shipments were down 9.6 percent in a quarter-over-quarter comparison, while Samsung shipments slipped less than one percent, according to the market tracker.

Meanwhile, China-based Xiaomi saw shipments grow about 33 percent to 40.8 million and Transsion about 85 percent to 28.5 million, taking third and fourth positions in the overall smartphone market, IDC reported.

“While Apple managed to capture the top spot at the end of 2023, Samsung successfully reasserted itself as the leading smartphone provider in the first quarter,” Reith said.

IDC expects Samsung and Apple to maintain their hold on the high end of the smartphone market while Chinese competitors seek to expand sales, according to Reith.

Nabila Popal, research director with IDC’s Worldwide Tracker team, said: “There is a shift in power among the Top 5 companies, which will likely continue as market players adjust their strategies in a post-recovery world.

“Xiaomi is coming back strong from the large declines experienced over the past two years and Transsion is becoming a stable presence in the Top 5 with aggressive growth in international markets.”

AFP


Kindly share this post
Continue Reading

Telecom

SHELT System Integration Launches “SHELT SI” in Nigeria

Published

on

Kindly share this post

SHELT, a leading provider of cybersecurity solutions, is proud to announce the launch of its new business unit in Nigeria, SHELT System Integration (SHELT SI).

SHELT SI PR

SHELT SI PR – 1

With a solid reputation built over six years of serving the nation’s financial, telecom, and government sectors, SHELT is now expanding its offerings to accelerate Nigeria’s digital transformation. The new business unit will operate under Cyber Immune Limited, a SHELT subsidiary in Nigeria.

SHELT SI emerges as a vital addition to SHELT’s portfolio, providing customers in Nigeria with trusted and unbiased expertise to design and implement cutting-edge, resilient, secure, and scalable solutions.

SHELT SI will forge strategic partnerships with global leaders to provide Networking and Cloud Management Solutions, Security Solutions, Collaboration Solutions, Managed services, Communication services, and IT Professional services while attracting top talent in Nigeria.

When asked about this milestone in SHELT’s growth, Mr. Youssef Abillama, Managing Partner of SHELT Global Limited, said: “We have full confidence in Nigeria and its commitment to digitization. SHELT is well positioned to be the technology partner of choice and trusted advisor to our customers in every step of their digitization journey.”

Mr. Walid Bou Abssi, Country Manager of SHELT Cyber Immune Limited, commented: “I am immensely proud of the launch of SHELT SI in Nigeria. This expansion underscores our dedication to empowering the nation’s digital evolution.

With SHELT SI, we are committed to providing unparalleled service to our clients, offering an unmatched value proposition driving innovation and resilience in Nigeria’s cybersecurity and network infrastructure space.”


Kindly share this post
Continue Reading

Trending