Connect with us

E-Business

Social Media as Strong Campaign Strategy For #Election2015

Published

on

Kindly share this post

In spite the evidence that social media have become crucial in political campaigns, Nigeria politicians are still yet to embrace these platforms as the right strategy for their political election quests.

In 2008, President Obama victory to become the president of the United States of America was digitally driven with integrated Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus into his campaign strategies and has continued to connect with the constituents on social media well, after winning the elections.

This was also experienced in India 2014 elections where social media were pivotal in the sweeping victory of the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP).

I believe it is time for political aspirants, in Nigeria, to really understand the importance of social media to their campaign successes.

It’s no secret that the campaign website is the hub of a campaign’s online activity, but social media are important supporting casts that can drive valuable traffic to the site and engage voters on a more personal level.

Social Media have rapidly grown in importance as fora for political activism in their different forms.

Social media platforms, such as Twitter, Facebook and YouTube provide new ways to stimulate citizen engagement in political life, where elections and electoral campaigns have a central role.

Personal communication via social media brings politicians and parties closer to their potential voters.

The process allows politicians to communicate faster and reach citizens in a more targeted manner and vice versa, without the intermediate role of mass media.

Reactions, feedback, conversations and debates are generated online as well as support and participation for offline events.

Messages posted to personal networks are multiplied when shared, which allow new audiences to be reached.

Social media has reshaped structures and methods of contemporary political communication by influencing the way politicians interact with citizens and each other.

In addition, you want to use social media for your election because the reach is huge, it appeals to the youths and real-time sharing is a viral tool for engagement.

What Social Media Should a Political Campaign Use? This question is a difficult one to answer.

When deciding how many social networks to join, it ultimately comes down to the candidate’s appeal and the campaign’s resources.

The number one rule is: to not have any social media presence become a “ghost town,” meaning, don’t join networks that you don’t have the available resources to update or be active in.

It reflects horribly on a campaign to have a vacuous social network profile – a rarely update presence makes it appear that the campaign doesn’t value that network and its demographics while also suggesting that the campaign is more of a spammer than general conversation constructer.

While the first rule is to not overextend yourself into too many networks, that doesn’t excuse any candidate from not having a presence on at least a few of the top networks.

We believe it’s absolutely necessary to have presences on at least: Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram and Google Plus.

I like to call these networks the Big Five.

They’re the fastest growing and farthest reaching of social networks; also, they represent Five distinct ways of publishing to and connecting with voters.

1.     Facebook is comprehensive and allows you to post pictures, add videos, send detailed mass messages, publicly interact on Walls, and more.

2.   Twitter excels in short message bursts, event updates, blog post pushes, and breaking news.  It allows a campaign to instantly send a succinct message to 1000’s of followers and also lets the campaign interact with other people in a one-on-one manner.

3.    YouTube is purely a video medium.  However, its reach cannot be underestimated.  The service’s search engine is second in use only to Google!

This staggering number of searches makes it essential to own your candidate’s name for search on this platform.

4.    Instagram should be used to publish campaign photos.

With over 150 million monthly active visitors, it’s an important place to be and exposes your campaign to an important network.

5.    Google Plus allows you to have video conferencing calls using hangout with your circle of voters. It also allows you post pictures and videos. Over 540 million active users.

As you can see, each network is totally unique and allows you to connect with a huge audience.  Voters expect every campaign to be on these media.

In addition to simply having a presence on each of these networks, you should update them frequently and make sure that they are linked to from your main campaign website, allowing voters to easily get access and engage you in the different networks.

Depending on your campaign’s message and target, other networks could also prove to be very useful.

For a candidate with a strong business background, LinkedIn is a logical choice.

There are dozens of other networks out there, with niche focuses ranging from veterans to volunteers.

If you have the available resources, the first networks to focus on after the “Big FIve” are those focused on niches to which your candidate has specific ties.

This strategy allows you to use natural synergies and capitalize on the base character of the candidate and campaign. No matter which networks you focus on though, it’s important to never break the first rule by allowing any of your presences to become a ghost town.

Tobi Asehinde is the founder and chief executive officer of Vibe Web Solutions Limited, a company poised to providing web and digital marketing solutions to meet the needs of both businesses and government organisation. Vibe Web Solutions Limited has clients based within and outside Nigeria servicing both businesses and governmental organisations. He can be contacted via: [email protected] or 0816 528 9018


Kindly share this post

Nigeria CommunicationsWeek believes that technology makes life more exciting and helps improve the lives of people around Nigeria and indeed the world. So since 2007, we have devoted our energy to independent reportage of technology and how they affect lives.

Continue Reading
Comments

E-Business

Millions of Cyber Attacks Launched on Nigeria, Others- Reports

Published

on

Kindly share this post

There were 3.8 million malware attacks and 16.8 million Potentially Unwanted Applications (PUA) detections over a 7-month period in Nigeria, according to Kaspersky security solutions.

Millions of Cyber Attacks Launched on Nigeria, Others- Reports

Elsewhere in South Africa, there were almost 10 million malware attacks and a staggering 43 million PUA detections, showing the growing desperation of the attacks.

The company reported on 28 million malware attacks in 2020 and 102 million detections of potentially unwanted programs (pornware, adware etc.) accounted for by the beginning of August 2020.

These numbers show that it’s not only the malware that attacks users but also the “grey zone” programmes that grow in popularity and disturb their experiences, while users might not even know it is there.

Potentially unwanted applications (PUAs) are programmes that are usually not considered to be malicious by themselves.

However, they are generally influencing user experience in a negative way. For instance, adware fills user device with ads; aggressive monetising software propagates unrequested paid offers; downloaders may download even more various applications on the device, sometimes malicious ones.

calculating interim results of threat landscape activity in African countries, Kaspersky researchers noticed that PUAs attack users almost four times more often than traditional malware.

They also eventually reach more users: for instance, while in South Africa, the malware would attack 415,000 users in 7-months of 2020, the figure for PUA would be 736,000.

“The reason why ‘grey zone’ software is growing in popularity is that it is harder to notice at first and that if the programme is detected, its creators won’t be considered to be cybercriminals. The problem with them is that users are not always aware they consented to the installation of such programmes on their device and that in some cases, such programmes are exploited or used as a disguise for malware downloads,” said Denis Parinov, a security researcher at Kaspersky.

By taking a closer look at PUA, it becomes apparent that they are not only more widespread but also more potent than traditional malware.

Evaluating results over the same 7-month period in Nigeria, there were 3.8 million malware attacks and 16.8 million PUA detections – which is four times as much.

Kenyan and South African threat landscapes have been more intense. In South Africa, there were almost 10 million malware attacks and a staggering 43 million PUA detections.

Kenyan users faced even more malware attacks – around 14 million, and 41 million PUA appearances, Kaspersky said.


Kindly share this post
Continue Reading

E-Business

Tech Giants Strike Deal with Advertisers over Hate Speech

Published

on

Kindly share this post

Web giants including Facebook have struck a deal with advertisers on how to identify harmful content such as hate speech, after an impasse over the issue which led to boycotts of the platform.

Tech Giants Strike Deal with Advertisers over Hate Speech

The agreement — which also included Twitter and YouTube — laid out for the first time a common set of definitions for hateful statements online.

In July, hundreds of advertisers including big-name consumer brands suspended advertising with Facebook as part of the #StopHateForProfit campaign, saying the social-media titan should do more to stamp out hatred and misinformation on its platform.

And earlier this month a group of celebrities — including Kim Kardashian, Leonardo DiCaprio and Katy Perry — stopped using Facebook and Instagram for 24 hours, to push a similar message.

The World Federation of Advertisers (WFA) said in a statement Wednesday: “Facebook, YouTube and Twitter, in collaboration with marketers and agencies through the Global Alliance for Responsible Media have agreed to adopt a common set of definitions for hate speech and other harmful content and to collaborate with a view to monitoring industry efforts to improve in this critical area.”

The alliance was founded by the WFA and includes other major trade bodies.

According to the WFA, key areas of agreement included applying the alliance’s common definitions of harmful content; developing reporting standards for such content; establishing independent oversight; and rolling out tools for keeping advertisements away from harmful content.

The WFA said that properly defining online hate speech would remove the current problem of different platforms using their own definitions, which it said made it difficult for companies to decide where to put their ads.

“As funders of the online ecosystem, advertisers have a critical role to play in driving positive change and we are pleased to have reached agreement with the platforms on an action plan and timeline in order to make the necessary improvements,” said Stephan Loerke, chief executive of the WFA.

Luis Di Como, executive vice-president of global media at Unilever, a major advertiser, sounded a note of cautious optimism.

He said: “The issues within the online ecosystem are complicated, and whilst change doesn’t happen overnight, today marks an important step in the right direction.”

Speaking in July, Facebook’s founder and chief executive Mark Zuckerberg said he remained adamant that the company did not want hate speech on the social network.

On Wednesday, the company’s vice-president for global marketing solutions, Carolyn Everson, said the agreement gave all parties “a unified language to move forward on the fight against hate online.”

 


Kindly share this post
Continue Reading

E-Business

Nigeria, Others Facing ‘Millions of Cyber Attacks’ in 2020

Published

on

Kindly share this post

Nigeria, Kenya and South Africa, continues to fall victim to millions of malware attacks and Potentially Unwanted Applications (PUAs), according to the latest research from Kaspersky.

The IT security firm says its security solutions have reported on 28 million malware attacks in 2020 and 102 million detections of PUA (including pornware, adware) accounted for by the beginning of August 2020.

PUAs are programs that are usually not considered to be malicious by themselves, Kaspersky explains. However, they are generally influencing user experience in a negative way.

For instance, adware fills user device with ads; aggressive monetizing software propagates unrequested paid offers; downloaders may download even more various applications on the device, sometimes malicious ones.

By taking a closer look at PUA, it becomes apparent that they are not only more widespread but also more potent than traditional malware, according to Kaspersky.

“Evaluating results over the same seven-month period in Nigeria, there were 3,8 million malware attacks and 16,8 million PUA detections – which is four times as much. Kenyan and South African threat landscapes have been more intense.

In South Africa, there were almost 10 million malware attacks and a staggering 43 million PUA detections. Kenyan users faced even more malware attacks – around 14 million, and 41 million PUA appearances,” the company adds.

These numbers show that it’s not only the malware that attacks users but also the ‘grey zone’ programs that grow in popularity and disturb their experiences, while users might not even know it is there.

While calculating interim results of threat landscape activity in African countries, the researchers noticed that PUAs attack users almost four times more often than traditional malware. They also eventually reach more users: for instance, while in South Africa, the malware would attack 415,000 users in seven months of 2020, the figure for PUA would be 736,000.

“The reason why ‘grey zone’ software is growing in popularity is that it is harder to notice at first and that if the program is detected, its creators won’t be considered to be cybercriminals.

“The problem with them is that users are not always aware they consented to the installation of such programs on their device and that in some cases, such programs are exploited or used as a disguise for malware downloads. This is why many security solutions, including ours, flags such programs to make sure users are aware of its presence, influence on their device and activity,” says Denis Parinov, a security researcher at Kaspersky.


Kindly share this post
Continue Reading
Advertisement

Social

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

Trending